for Sunday 12th June 1966
Last
This
Presented by Ed Stewart
Week
Week
4
1
Paperback Writer Beatles
1
2
Don't Bring Me Down Animals
3
3
Not Responsible Tom Jones
15
4
Don't Answer Me Cilla Black
10
5
Opus 17 (Don't You Worry 'Bout Me) Four Seasons
17
6
Over Under Sideways Down Yardbirds
19
7
River Deep Mountain High Ike & Tina Turner
2
8
Nothing Comes Easy Sandie Shaw
6
9
Twinkie-Lee Gary Walker
28
10
Sunny Afternoon Kinks
11
11
Stop Her On Sight (SOS) Edwin Starr
21
12
Sweet Talkin' Guy Chiffons
23
13
Hideaway Dave Dee Dozy Beaky Mick & Tich
29
14
Nobody Needs Your Love Gene Pitney
5
15
Lady Jane David Garrick
12
16
Don't Take The Lovers From The World Shirley Bassey
30
17
I Am A Rock Simon & Garfunkel
38
18
Sittin' On A Fence Twice As Much
20
19
When A Man Loves A Woman Percy Sledge
18
20
Paint It Black Rolling Stones
7
21
Whatcha Gonna Do Now Chris Andrews
9
22
Strangers In The Night Frank Sinatra
32
23
Club Of Lights Oscar
24
Younger Girl Critters
25
I Need You (EP) Walker Brothers
26
Stop! Before You Get Me Going Knack
35
27
You've Made Your Choice Rothchilds
28
Along Comes Mary Association
29
Runaway/Come On Let's Go McCoys
8
30
Misty Morning Eyes Barry Mason
31
Hold On, I'm Comin' Cliff Bennett & the Rebel Rousers
32
Just Like Him David Wilcox
33
Glendora Downliners Sect
40
34
Beggars Parade Falling Leaves
37
35
Haywire Bean & Loopy's Lot
13
36
Monday Monday Mamas & Papas
37
Merci Cherie Vince Hill
38
The Music Goes Round Jeeps
36
39
I've Laid Some Down In My Time Tony Colton
40
I've Been Hurt Guy Darrell
40
Mama B J Thomas

Aboard the Galaxy this week
On June 14th, Bill Hearne (Knees Club member #334) joined Radio London, having been heard first on Radio Luxembourg and more recently, on Caroline South.

Ashore
On Friday, June 17th at Beaconsfield Youth Club, Knees Club Officials permitted Phil Jay from Radio City to sign up as Knees Club member #287, because he told us he was friendly with the Big L jocks. Phil (centre of picture, right, courtesy of Raoul Verolleman) was the only non-Big L offshore jock from the Sixties invited to join the KC till the year 2000, when Bud Ballou (#380) was inducted to become the club's new Vice-President!

On June 18th, a 'top Radio London DJ' – Earl Richmond – appeared at the Uxbridge Blues Festival alongside Manfred Mann, the Action, Long Steam Packet, featuring John Baldry and the Brian Auger Trinity with Julie Driscoll.

17
6
Over Under Sideways Down Yardbirds Columbia DB 7928

The Yardbirds joined the KC on May 10th at Wycombe Town Hall, at the time the band was charting with the innovative Shapes of Things. The line-up then was Jeff Beck (#247), who proceeded to become the owner of one of the club’s most famous pairs of knees, Paul Samwell-Smith (#249) Chris Dreja (#245), Keith Relf (#248) and Jim McCarty (#246). This was the Yardbirds, mark III, Jeff Beck having joined from The Tridents, to replace Eric Clapton. As a blues man who'd thought the group he was playing in was strictly an r & b outfit, Clapton was not impressed with the Yardbirds' move towards commercial pop.

By June, Paul Samwell-Smith had left to become a producer, his place taken by Jimmy Page. This impressive Yardbirds Mark 4 line-up remained in place between June and November of '66.

Relf and McCarty later formed Renaissance. Keith, sadly, met an untimely end in 1976 when he connected his guitar to an unearthed amp, suffering accidental electrocution.

In Pete Frame's 'Rock Family Trees', Jeff Beck cites the Yardbirds as the very first psychedelic band. Keith Relf is quoted as saying that his happiest memories of the band were those before their 'hit' period, when they played r 'n' b residencies at the Crawdaddy and Marquee clubs.

40
34
Beggars Parade Falling Leaves Decca F12420

Beggars Parade is a cover of a Gaudio/Crew song, the B-side of the Four Seasons' Opus 17 (Don't Worry 'Bout Me), currently high in the US charts.

From Oxford, the Falling Leaves were Rod Stephens, vocals, Neil Stanley, organ, Will Patrick lead, Mal West, bass and Larry Nedel, drums. In 1965, they had a single released on Parlophone called She Loves to be Loved, which when posted on Youtube, prompted the comment from keyboard player Neil Stanley, that it was "written purely for the Ready Stead Win! talent show and was not totally representative of the more 'bluesy' style we played." Being obliged to record something unrepresentative of the band's normal style on the insistence of management and record companies, was a fate bemoaned by many musicians of the time.

Webmaster Mary writes:
Beggars' Parade
had long proved a source of puzzlement to me, as I was absolutely convinced the song contained the phrase 'flowery bum'! Having been mistaken about song lyrics on many occasions, I simply decided that my ears had been deceiving me again. However, I eventually reached the conclusion that 'flowery bum' was indeed the phrase Falling Leaves are singing, but it did not mean 'florally-enhanced posterior'! As the song is after all, about beggars, the word 'bum' is used here in the American sense of the word, i.e. 'tramp'. My eventual conclusion was that 'flowery bum' described a flower-power hippy drop-out... until I heard from Peter Tomlinson! Peter imparts the invaluable information that, "The phrase is in fact "Bowery bum", a reference of course to New York City's infamous Skid Row of the 1800s up until recently, when it acquired a bit of hip cachet as home to equally infamous punk club CBGB."

37
35
Haywire Bean & Loopy's Lot Parlophone R 5458

Little is known about Bean and Loopy's Lot, but both Haywire and its B-side Stitch In Time, were written by George Bean and fellow 'Loopy' Anthony Catchpole, who was to join the Alan Bown Set the following year.

In 1963, as a soloist, George Bean became the first artist other than the Stones to record a Stones' song – two, in fact, on the 'A' and 'B' sides of his second single, Will You Be My Lover Tonight/It Should Be You (Decca F11808). Waxed in 1963, the single was not issued till '64, meaning that Gene Pitney won the race to be first artist to release a Stones' song, with That Girl Belongs To Yesterday.

Around 1965, George's band was called George Bean and the Runners, featuring drummer Barry (BJ) Wilson, later of the Paramounts. That version of the band issued one single , Dylan's She Belongs To Me (Decca F12228). which failed to climb the Nationals. He appeared in the 1967 film Privilege starring Paul Jones, singing uptempo versions of the hymns Onward Christian Soldiers and Jerusalem, backed by 'The George Bean Band'.

George Bean later formed another band called Trifle but unfortunately, died before their album was issued in the early Seventies.

40
Mama B J Thomas Pye International 7N 25374

In the first week of June, the Association was the successful US act that only ever had one hit in the UK. In week two of June, 12/06/66, B J Thomas is in the same situation. His sole UK chart entry was Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head – the Bacharach/David song featured, somewhat incongruously, in the tremendously-successful film, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. Billy Joe Thomas had no less than twenty-five entries in the US Hot Hundred between 1966 and 1978. Mama was #22 in the US chart in June '66, but lost out here to Sheffield's own Dave Berry, who took the song to #5 in the Nationals, #18 in the Fab.

Besides climbers that were played at the time of the broadcast of the Sunday Fab Forty, Alan kept a note of others he heard later in the week and incorporated them into his list.

DJ Climbers:    
Indication Zombies Tony Blackburn
Have I Stayed Too Long Sonny & Cher Dave Dennis
Will I Never Learn Kathy Kirby John Edward
I Love Onions Laurie Kenny Everett
I Can Go Down Jimmy Powell & the Dimensions Paul Kaye
Get Away Georgie Fame & the Blue Flames Mike Lennox
Scrooey Mooey Peels Mark Roman
Can I Trust You Bachelors Ed Stewart
Bus Stop Hollies Willy Walker
Livin' Above Your Head Jay & the Americans Tony Windsor
Indication Zombies Decca F12426

Zombies stomper Indication was Tony Blackburn's first Big L climber, after joining the station on 7th June. It did well in the Fabs, but sadly not the Nationals. In recent years the song has featured regularly on Colin Blunstone and Rod Argent's set list (whether playing as Blunstone and Argent or as the Zombies).

On June 13th, Tony (our new Knees Club recruit #274), gave the club one of its many on-air plugs over the Big L airwaves, at 12.45pm.

(Thanks to Alan Hardy for this photo and the one of Bill Hearne)

Scrooey Mooey Peels Audio Fidelity AFSP 527

The Peels was a studio band assembled by Tash Howard, consisting of Gail Allan, Bill Spilka and Harvey Davis. The name 'Peels' was picked to tie in with their novelty release Juanita Banana - yes, banana peels. The record scored a minor hit in the Hot Hundred in February 66. The fruit-obsessed Howard also wrote Juanita Banana Part 2 as a follow-up later that year, bearing a b-side called Rosita Tomato! (He could have made it a hattrick with 'Melissa Mango' or 'Clarissa Kiwifruit'...)

Juanita Banana seemed to capture the imagination of novelty aficionados internationally. A variety of artists recorded the song ("der grosse US Comic Hit!" proclaims the German picture sleeve, while the UK was possibly the country least impressed by the song. Here, the Peels' recording had divebombed in May, following a similar fate for a cover by our own comedian Terry Scott. The record companies seemed determined to persevere with releasing new versions, but Argentinian Luis Aguile's cover followed the others into the UK dross box in November.

The banana theme never ceased and photo sleeves depicted Juanita 'milking' Scrooy Mooey!


Climbers:  
Excuse Me Baby Magic Lanterns
Breakout Mitch Ryder & the Detroit Wheels
Willow Tree Ivy League
No One Will Ever Know Frank Ifield
Black Is Black Los Bravos
Pinocchio Boz
Sandie Swinging Blue Jeans
It's A Man's Man's Man's World James Brown & the Famous Flames
I Ain't Gonna Eat My Heart Out Any More New York Public Library
Heart's Desire Billy Joe Royal
Friday Night Red Hawkes
Making Time Creation
You Gave Me Somebody To Love Fortunes / Manfred Mann
Dum-De-Da Bobby Vinton*
Out Of Time Chris Farlowe*
*(Note: These records are shown as climbers. They were DJ picks the following week, so may have been late additions to the current week's climber list, or perhaps were aired prematurely.
Disc of the Week:  
This Door Swings Both Ways Herman's Hermits
Album of the Week:  
If You Can Believe Your Eyes and Ears Mamas and Papas

Pinocchio Boz Columbia DB 7941

Originally from Lincolnshire and called the Tea Time Four, Boz was an outfit named after vocalist, Raymond 'Boz' Burrell. The band appears to have been unable to settle on a name, having been known on occasions as 'The Boz', 'Boz People' and also as 'Boz and The Boz People' and were an occasional backing band for Kenny Lynch. Whatever the title, the little-known London group had an impressive line-up of musicians passing through its ranks

Boz went on to join King Crimson, then Bad Company.

One-time lead guitarist, Ian Whiteman, switched instruments to piano and sax, when he formed Mighty Baby with ex-members of The Action, in '68.

In the period around November 1967 to March 1968 the current version of the group, at that time called simply Boz, contained famous session men of the era, including two Knees Club members. Guitarist, Ritchie Blackmore (#220) and Ian Paice (#311) on drums, accompankneed non-members, Boz, bassist Chas Hodges (later of Chas and Dave) with Jon Lord on keyboards.

Another former Boz keyboard player, Ian McLagan, presumably did not perform on any of the singles, as he had left to join the Small Faces in October '65 and was still with them when they evolved into The Faces in '69. He described the style of Boz People as "somewhat jazzy". Ian went on to play with both the Who and the Stones. Sadly, he died in December 2014.

Pinnochio was Boz's third disc to be issued in '66. In all, six singles were released on the Columbia label between '66 and '68, including a cover of the Doors' Light My Fire, but none of them saw any action in the Nationals.

The Pinnochio UK release was backed with Stay As You Are. The follow-up, also from '66, The Baby Song (Columbia DB 7972) had Carry On Screaming as its 'B' side, however, overseas releases had Pinnochio paired with The Baby Song. Written by Myles Rudge and Ted Dick, Carry On Screaming was the title song from the comedy horror film starring Carry On favourites, Fenella Fielding, Kenneth Williams and Jim Dale. The film's credits unhelpfully name the singer as 'Anon', but the theme song was described elsewhere as being sung by "up and coming recording star, Boz". All this anonymity led to false rumours at the time that Boz was Jim Dale, incognito.

The 67/8 Boz line-up containing the two Knees Club members, played on the fifth Boz single, a Dylan cover, I Shall Be Released (Columbia DB 84006) The track appeared on several Ritchie Blackmore (#220) compilations, including Ritchie Blackmore Vol 1.

Brian Long in his book The London Sound records that Boz visited the Galaxy on 17th June, but whether the visitor was Boz Burrell the man, or Boz the group, is unknown!

Webmasters Chris and Mary had the pleasure of seeing Boz Burrell perform with Bad Company in San Diego in 1999. He is also in the film Bad Company Live, released in 2000. He passed away at his home in Spain in September 2006. Read Boz's interview with Sid Smith here.

Bad Company Website: www.badcompany.com

The red additions to the climbers indicate singles listed in Brian Long's book 'The London Sound' based on information typed in the Curzon Street offices or other sources.
Alan Field did not hear them played or announced as climbers.


The Caroline 'Countdown Sixty' chart (south ship) for this week is here

This week's Radio City 'City Sixty' on the Pirate Radio Hall of Fame is here

Tune in next week for another Field's Fab Forty!


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