for Sunday 31st July 1966

Last
This

Presented by Chris Denning

Week
Week
2
1
With A Girl Like You Troggs
6
2
Summer In The City Lovin' Spoonful
8
3
Visions Cliff Richard
7
4
Hi-Lili Hi-Lo Alan Price Set
14
5
Barefootin' Robert Parker
3
6
Love Letters Elvis Presley
29
7
Lovers Of The World Unite David & Jonathan
26
8
God Only Knows Beach Boys
31
9
I Saw Her Again Mamas & Papas
1
10
Black Is Black Los Bravos
22
11
Hanky Panky Tommy James & the Shondells
27
12
I Want You Bob Dylan
13
13
The Man Who Took The Valise Off The Floor Of Grand Central Station At Noon She Trinity
15
14
I Love How You Love Me Paul & Barry Ryan
34
15
Doctor Love Bobby Sheen
28
16
More Than Love Ken Dodd
17
17
Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever Four Tops
18
18
Mama Dave Berry
4
19
(Baby) You Don't Have To Tell Me Walker Brothers
5
20
Oops Neil Christian
10
21
Out Of Time Chris Farlowe
40
22
You Better Run Young Rascals
9
23
Going Back Dusty Springfield
24
Headline News Alan Bown Set / Edwin Starr
25
Give Me Your Word Billy Fury
26
Where Were You When I Needed You? Grass Roots
21
27
The More I See You Chris Montez
28
Big Time Operator Zoot Money's Big Roll Band
29
So Sad About Us Merseys
30
Just Like A Woman Jonathan King / Manfred Mann
32
31
Sh-Boom Sh-Boom Diane Ferraz & Nicky Scott
25
32
How Long Is Time? Odyssey
33
This And That Tom Jones
35
34
The Moment Of Truth Three Good Reasons
35
Tell Her Dean Parrish
36
There She Is Clayton Squares
37
37
Half A Picture Daemon Dee
38
Hungry Paul Revere & the Raiders
20
39
Lil' Red Riding Hood Sam the Sham & the Pharaohs
33
40
Green Light Tony Blackburn


37
37
Half A Picture Daemon Dee Columbia DB 7970

Daemon Dee was a pseudonym of blues and folk singer Cliff Aungier. He penned the single's B-side, Tell Me Baby, which is one of eleven Pall Mall-published compositions featuring in this week's playlist.

Cliff, who sadly died in March 2004, is remembered as a respected folk and blues singer who in 1963 co-founded the Half-Moon Club in Putney, which attracted top names, including the Stones and the Who. He also presented a weekly show 'The Rhythm And The Blues' for BFBS radio. His 1969 album The Lady From Baltimore, contained two Bee Gees-penned tracks, Morning of My Life and Words. Both tracks are now available on the compilation of Bees Gees covers, Maybe Someone is Digging Underground.

The strange publicity clip on the left, (kindly supplied by Hans Knot) fails to mention the title of the single it talks about and unfortunatly, is inaccurate about the Fab 40 position. Despite its Pall Mall B-side, Half a Picture reached only #37, where it remained for 2 weeks before vanishing.



This week Ashore

On Friday, August 5th, the Beatles' seventh studio album Revolver was released. It had already been Radio London Album of the Week and now the double-sided single taken from it, Eleanor Rigby/Yellow Submarine, released on the same day, is chosen as Radio London Club Disc of the Week.

 

Besides climbers that were played at the time of the broadcast of the Sunday Fab Forty, Alan kept a note of others he heard later in the week and incorporated them into his list.

DJ Climbers:    
(You Make Me Feel) So Good McCoys Tony Blackburn
Cast Your Fate To The Wind Shelby Flint Chris Denning
There She Goes J & B Dave Dennis
Popsicle Jan & Dean Kenny Everett
Opportunity Jason Dene Bill Hearne
Too Soon To Know Roy Orbison Paul Kaye
Sweet Dreams Tommy McLain Mike Lennox
Blowin' In The Wind Stevie Wonder Mark Roman
Take Your Love Bobby Goldsboro Keith Skues
Stop That Girl Chris Andrews Ed Stewart
So Fine Santelles Norman St John
All Or Nothing Small Faces Tony Windsor

There She Goes J & B Polydor 56095

Guitarist Michael Leslie Jones and drummer Thomas Francis Brown went by the name of J & B for the release of just one single, but it was not merely the initials of their surnames. Both were soul fans and admirers of James Brown and intended There She Goes to be a tribute to the Godfather of Soul. The name printed on the Polydor label is The J & B, but it seems more likely that Jones and Brown intended to call themselves simply 'J & B'. That was certainly how they were billed on the Curzon Street list.

Early in the decade, the duo had been in one of many line-ups of Nero and the Gladiators, a band that had enjoyed a couple of minor instrumental hits. It was during their performance at the Paris Olympia that the talents of Mickand Tommy were spotted by French megastar Johnny Hallyday, who recruited them initially for his wife Sylvie Vartan's backing band. They also backed Hallyday himself, as regular members of his session men, Les Blackburds.

When Hallyday decided to record a soul album, Mick landed the enviable job of going to the States to record backing tracks with Otis Redding's band (presumably the MGs), with Hallyday's vocals to be added later. "When Otis heard that Johnny was covering some of his songs, he flew to Paris and sat in on the sessions. That was unbelievable, hilarious! Otis would look at me and say, 'How we gonna help this guy get some soul?'", Mick told Record Collector magazine in 1994.

In France, Mick honed his songwriting skills and contributed to many recordings, including several movie soundtracks. In 1965 he gave Cliff Richard a Fab Forty Top Twenty entry with his song The Time In Between – although it fared less well in the Nationals. Mick and Tommy released other singles (and in France, an EP) as The State of Micky and Tommy (with Micky sometimes spelt 'Mickey'). Les Blackburds released singles of their own, including their instrumental take on The In Crowd. However, as the Sixties became the Seventies, Micky became involved in other ventures and his long-time musical partnership with Tommy ceased. Their catalogue of work is now collected on the 24-track CD The State of Micky and Tommy.

Although very much a part of the music business since the Fifties, Mick Jones's biggest hits came in the late Seventies and Eighties when he founded rockers Foreigner and enjoyed huge international success with hits, I Want to Know What Love Is, Waiting for a Girl Like You and Cold As Ice. The band website describes him thus: "The architect behind Foreigner’s extraordinary catalogue of smash hits, Mick has crafted some of rock music’s most enduring songs and produced 10 multi-platinum albums. (He is a) Grammy and Golden Globe-nominated songwriter, performer and producer and winner of the prestigious Ivor Novello songwriter award in Britain in 1998."

In mint condition, There She Goes can command a price of £50 or more, while the two singles released under the banner of The State of Micky and Tommy are even more highly valued.


Climbers:  
This Heart Of Mine Jimmy James & the Vagabonds
When You Walk In The Sand Tuesday's Children
Harlem Shuffle Mike Cotton Sound
Peace Of Mind Zuider Zee
Got To Get You Into My Life Cliff Bennett & the Rebel Rousers
5 O'Clock World Greg Hunter
Things Get Better Rey Anton
Doing What She's Not Supposed to Do Barron Knights
Disc of the Week:  
Yellow Submarine / Eleanor Rigby Beatles
Album of the Week:  
Follow Me Crispian St Peters

Climber Controversy!
The Climber list as typed at the Curzon Street offices. It also includes 'slippers' - records that have left the chart this week. (Click on the list for a legible version.)


Doing What She's Not Supposed to Do Barron Knights Columbia DB7933

In a recording from Tuesday August 2nd 1966, Kenny Everett is sitting in on the breakfast show before going on shore leave. He plays Doing What She's Not Supposed to Do by the Barron Knights and remarks how near to the knuckle the song is. He continues that if he'd realised sooner how rude it was, he'd have played it twice! Ken announces the Barron Knights as Ed Stewart's climber, but Alan Field noted Stewpot's climber that week as Stop That Girl by Chris Andrews. He did not hear anyone play the Barron Knights.

In his book The London Sound, Brian Long lists the Barron Knights' record as Ed Stewart's climber for the week commencing 31st July 1966. Brian says:

You will see from the official Curzon Street listing that Ed was not down for a climber on the week in question! At this distance, I can only assume that I identified his climber from this Kenny Everett recording. Chris Andrews was not officially included as a climber until the following week, when Ed's climber was Jr. Walker.

Alan Field, assuming that Stop That Girl wasn't played as the Ed Stewart climber on the Fab 40 Show on Sunday 31st July, speculates as to what probably happened:

No Stewpot climber appeared on the Curzon Street list, so no Stewpot climber was played on the Fab 40 show. Ed grabbed the Barron Knights record as an available climber and it was played Monday and early Tuesday. After the tender visit on Tuesday, Ed decided he didn't like the Barron Knights record, or it was too near the knuckle for further airplay, and he grabbed Stop That Girl as his climber instead. That record would have been brought out to the ship on that morning's tender, and intended for the following week's playlist. I assume I heard it played and announced as the Stewpot climber sometime between Tuesday afternoon and the following Sunday morning (2nd - 7th August '66).

Webmaster's note: The singles on the Curzon Street list marked with an asterisk have Pall Mall-published songs on one, or both sides. Marianne Faithfull wrote her Pall Mall B-side I'd Like to Dial Your Number.


The red additions to the climbers indicate singles listed in Brian Long's book 'The London Sound' based on information typed in the Curzon Street offices or other sources.
Alan Field did not hear them played or announced as climbers.


The Caroline 'Countdown Sixty' chart (south ship) for this week is here

This week's Radio City 'City Sixty' on the Pirate Radio Hall of Fame is here
This week's Radio England 'Boss Forty' on the Pirate Radio Hall of Fame is here

Tune in next week for another Field's Fab Forty


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