for Sunday 10th July 1966

Last
This
Presented by Chris Denning
Week
Week
2
1
Get Away Georgie Fame & the Blue Flames
15
2
I Couldn't Live Without Your Love Petula Clark
12
3
Out Of Time Chris Farlowe
13
4
Black Is Black Los Bravos
17
5
The More I See You Chris Montez
3
6
Sittin' On A Fence Twice As Much
1
7
Bus Stop Hollies
6
8
Nobody Needs Your Love Gene Pitney
21
9
You Gave Me Somebody To Love Manfred Mann
14
10
This Door Swings Both Ways Herman's Hermits
26
11
A House In The Country Pretty Things
24
12
Going Back Dusty Springfield
13
Love Letters Elvis Presley
11
14
The Music Goes Round Jeeps
20
15
No One Will Ever Know Frank Ifield
5
16
Paperback Writer Beatles
40
17
Nothing In The World Geneveve
18
18
Lovers Of The World Unite David & Jonathan
25
19
Oops Neil Christian
40
20
Midnight Mary Rockin' Berries
7
21
I Need You (EP) Walker Brothers
22
(Baby) You Don't Have To Tell Me Walker Brothers
4
23
It's A Man's Man's Man's World James Brown & the Famous Flames
24
I Love How You Love Me Paul & Barry Ryan
30
25
Friday Night Red Hawkes
8
26
Hideaway Dave Dee Dozy Beaky Mick & Tich
38
27
Something's Going On In There Behind My Back Dick Jordan
28
Mama Dave Berry
29
Summer In The City Lovin' Spoonful
29
Lil' Red Riding Hood Sam the Sham & the Pharaohs
30
Sweet Pea Tommy Roe
10
31
River Deep Mountain High Ike & Tina Turner
32
With A Girl Like You Troggs
16
33
Sunny Afternoon Kinks
34
No 1 In Your Heart Herbie Goins & the Night-Timers
35
Counting Marianne Faithfull
36
Hi-Lili Hi-Lo Alan Price Set
37
Happy Summer Days Ronnie Dove
37
Don't Come Running To Me Madeline Bell
38
Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever Four Tops
33
39
It's That Time Of The Year Len Barry
40
Thirty Second Floor Washington DC's
40
How Long Is Time? Odyssey


40
How Long Is Time? Odyssey Strike JH 312

Very little is known about Odyssey. The sleevenotes for Strike Records' 'Best of Strike' compilation imply that the band's vocalist was Brindley D Spender, aka Ken Smart, but whether the singer's real identity was Brindley, Ken or another name altogether, the CD notes admit that this information has vanished somewhere in the vinyl vaults. Ken Smart did write How Long is Time and its B-side Beware and he also had a solo Strike single, The Company I Keep – its writer named as B D Spender. That song was also released in the UK in 1968 on the Domain label under the name of Brindley D Spender, but in Germany as -you've guessed it - Ken Smart! There is also a rarity from 1968 called The Company I Keep.

A drummer called Dave Preston is also alleged to have enhanced the Odyssey line-up, but nothing else has surfaced about the band. However, one thing that has now been confirmed is that the long-held belief that there is some connection between Odyssey and Sons of Fred is a myth. The rumour has been quashed by the Sons's bassist Pete Sears
. (Although it is hard to eradicate and still keeps rearing its head at various places on the internet.)

One of only 2 pictures of Odyssey that we have been able to track down is on an EP sleeve issued in France on the Zag label (below left) where Beware (the UK B-side) is being promoted as the main track. This is assuming that the photo genuinely is Odyssey. Several instances have shown that the wrong photos were sometimes sent out by record companies or were mixed up with those of other groups at the printers. Although the sleeve gives the impression that the EP features four songs by Odyssey, the French website Vinyl Vidi Vici reveals that the only other Odyssey track is How Long is Time and that the other two cuts are Love Me Right and I Can Go Down, both by Jimmy Powell and the Dimensions. At least we can be pretty certain that the band shown on the sleeve isn't Jimmy Powell and the Dimensions, as there are six of them and only four guys in this photo! The photo on the right could well be the same four guys, looking moody (and who can blame them?) in a patch of stinging nettles. The same photo appears on the German picture sleeve.

Many thanks to Claude Picard for allowing us to reproduce the EP photo from his site. Claude is the webmaster of Vinyl Vidi Vici an interesting encyclopaedia of singles and EPs released in France between 1960 and 1975 – both French and overseas pressings.



37
Happy Summer Days Ronnie Dove Stateside SS524

Virtually unknown in the UK, although he released 18 singles here, Baltimore's Ronnie Dove enjoyed 21 US chart entries between 1964 and 69. Happy Summer Days reached #27. In 1965, he won Billboard Awards as Top Singles Artist and Top Selling Easy Listening Artist, plus Cashbox Awards for Best Singles Male Vocalist and Best LP Male Vocalist. In the same year, he also won awards as diverse as Top Easy Listening Artist (Billboard) and Best R&B Male Vocalist and Best R&B records (Cashbox). 2015, marked Ronni'se 60th year in music. He had planned to retire in 2014, but continued to performe after seeing an improvement in health problems. His personal website is here.

Aboard the Galaxy this week

July 11th
My signature tune and all-time favourite song, Along Comes Mary had reached #7 in the Fab for 26th June 66, although it never touched the Nationals. On July 11th, Kenny Everett persuaded Dave Dennis to come into the studio during his show to read the lyrics – written by Tandyn Almer – for the edification of Big L listeners. After the performance, Kenny announced, "That was Along Comes Mary, ladies and gentlemen, as Dave Dennis crawls out of the studio on his knees."

Many thanks to Willy from the Netherlands for the scan of the pic sleeve

The song is generally regarded as being about marijuana and according to the Songfacts website, the Association had a long and troubled 'association' with drugs. Their bass player Brian Cole overdosed on heroin in 1972. It was many years before I realised that Along Comes Mary might have drug connotations – although the lyrics can be interpreted however the listener chooses. The song and many interesting comments about it can be found on the Songfacts website, where one contributor writes that Tandyn Almer stated in an interview that he "sat on the sidewalk on Sunset Strip in Hollywood, stoned, and wrote 419 verses to this song. It had nothing to do with religion but was solely about the perspective that marijuana gave him about the people who passed by and the events taking place at the time." How he managed to narrow down the 419 verses to 6, is unknown.

Also on July 11th, TW expressed some doubts about having chosen Hanky Panky as his climber, even though as he told his audience, it was top in the US "as I speak". Tony explained that his reservations were because the Hanky Panky was a dance craze that had yet to arrive in the UK, but he had been won over by the sound and felt the single would be successful in the UK. It did enter the Nationals on July 21st and stayed for seven weeks, peaking at #38. However, there must have been a missing 's' somewhere along the way, as Tony was announcing the band as Tommy James and the 'Hondells'.

Norm St John's climber this week was singing shipmate Tony Blackburn's third single, Green Light.

Besides climbers that were played at the time of the broadcast of the Sunday Fab Forty, Alan kept a note of others he heard later in the week and incorporated them into his list.

DJ Climbers:    
Barefootin' Robert Parker Tony Blackburn
Sh-Boom Sh-Boom Diane Ferraz & Nicky Scott Chris Denning
It's So Hard Honeycombs Dave Dennis
Tell Her I'm Not Home Ike & Tina Turner Kenny Everett
When The Sun Comes Out Force West Bill Hearne
Let Me Tell You Babe Nat King Cole Duncan Johnson
Hi Hi Hazel Geno Washington & the Ram Jam Band Paul Kaye
Doctor Love Bobby Sheen Mike Lennox
High On Love Knickerbockers Mark Roman
Not A One Girl Guy Barry Benson Keith Skues
Little Girl Syndicate Of Sound Ed Stewart
Green Light Tony Blackburn Norman St John
Hanky Panky Tommy James & the Shondells Tony Windsor

Hanky Panky Tommy James & the Shondells Roulette RK7000

Alan Hardy:
I always thought in 1966 that Tommy James and the Shondells’ ‘Hanky Panky’ sounded as if it came from a different era. It did – it was recorded in 1963. In 1966 a Pittsburgh ‘club’ DJ found a copy in a secondhand record shop and played it at one of his dances. The kids loved it and inundated local radio stations with requests to play it. A bootlegger then pressed up 80,000 copies and it went to number one in the city. Tommy found out only after being asked to make live appearances, when he had to recruit a new batch of Shondells! He then took the original master to Roulette Records in New York who issued it legally and it kicked off his career for real.

Climbers:
On The Good Ship Lollipop Wonder Who
The Light Of The Charge Brigade Viv Prince
I Washed My Hands In Muddy Water Johnny Rivers
Ninety Nine And A Half (Won't Do) Wilson Pickett
Singing the Blues Jason Eddie and the Centremen
God Only Knows Tony Rivers & the Castaways
Past, Present And Future Shangri-Las
The Man Who Took The Valise Off The Floor Of Grand Central Station At Noon She Trinity
Disc of the Week:
Visions Cliff Richard
Album of the Week:
Would You Believe Hollies


Singin' the Blues Jason Eddie and the Centremen Parlophone R5473

Although Alan Field did not hear Singin' the Blues announced as a climber, it has been added to this week's playlist because a recording exists of TW from 11th July – the day after the Fab Forty countdown – playing the track up to the 11.30 news. Singin' the Blues was a Joe Meek-produced reworking of the old Guy Mitchell/Tommy Steele hit. Jason Eddie was the stage name adopted by Billy Fury's brother, Albie Wycherley. However his pseudonym is spelt differently on the CD Joe Meek: The Alchemist of Pop - Home Made Hits and Rarities 1958-1966, as Jason Eddy & The Centremen. (The CD features several other obscure Fab Forty tracks.) Like most rare Meek releases, the original vinyl is highly collectable, with a pristine copy valued at around £125.

The Light Of The Charge Brigade Viv Prince Columbia DB 7960

Infamous as the worst-behaved member of those Kings of Unruliness, the Pretty Things, drummer Viv Prince quit the band in 1965. As he had played with the somewhat-less-controversial Carter-Lewis and the Southerners prior to joining the Pretties, John Carter agreed to co-produce The Light Of The Charge Brigade, Prince's one solo instrumental release. Mint copies can command in the region of £35. (Click on the picture for an Amazon link to more information about the Record Collector Rare Record Price Guide.) Although Viv had long been rumoured to be deceased, at the 40th anniversary Friars Aylesbury reunion gig, Phil May apparently stated that this was untrue. (See the Pretty Things' Wikipedia entry)



The red additions to the climbers indicate singles listed in Brian Long's book 'The London Sound' based on information typed in the Curzon Street offices or other sources.
Alan Field did not hear them played or announced as climbers.


The Caroline 'Countdown Sixty' chart (south ship) for this week is here

This week's Radio City 'City Sixty' on the Pirate Radio Hall of Fame is here

Tune in next week for another Field's Fab Forty!


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