for Sunday 29th January 1967

A selection of sprogs are crawling around Field's Fab Forty with 'Matthew And Son' at #3, 'Thank You Baby' by Graham Bonney at #15, 'Here Comes My Baby' at #18, 'I Can't Break The Habit Of Lovin' You Baby' at #20, 'Stay With Me Baby' at #21 and 'Baby What I Mean', #23. Tuesday's Children #37, And then of course, there's 'It Takes Two' at #8! In the climbers, there's another 'Baby' (and its B-side is called 'Baby Come Closer') and 'Young and Warm and Wonderful' is Album of the Week.

Last
This
Presented by Ed Stewart
Week
Week
3
1
Let's Spend The Night Together / Ruby Tuesday Rolling Stones
4
2
I've Been A Bad Bad Boy Paul Jones
1
3
Matthew And Son Cat Stevens
6
4
98.6 Keith
25
5
I'm A Man Spencer Davis Group
19
6
Peek-A-Boo New Vaudeville Band
12
7
Good Thing Paul Revere & the Raiders
9
8
It Takes Two Marvin Gaye & Kim Weston
35
9
I Had Too Much To Dream Last Night Electric Prunes
11
10
Let Me Cry On Your Shoulder Ken Dodd
5
11
I'm A Believer Monkees
14
12
Try A Little Tenderness Otis Redding
_
13
Snoopy Vs The Red Baron Royal Guardsmen
2
14
Standing In The Shadows Of Love Four Tops
22
15
Thank You Baby Graham Bonney
8
16
No Fun At The Fair Bobby Goldsboro
28
17
Release Me Engelbert Humperdinck
10
18
Here Comes My Baby Tremeloes
40
19
You Only You Rita Pavone
39
20
The Habit Of Lovin' You Baby Nino Tempo & April Stevens
_
21
Stay With Me Baby Walker Brothers
_
22
I Won't Come In While He's There Jim Reeves
7
23
Baby What I Mean Drifters
_
24
Backstreet Girl Nicky Scott
_
25
My Way Of Giving Chris Farlowe
_
26
Harlem Shuffle Traits
38
27
Sweet Georgie Fame Blossom Dearie
_
28
Get Down With It Little Richard
_
29
I've Passed This Way Before Jimmy Ruffin
20
30
Sugar Town Nancy Sinatra
_
31
The Beat Goes On Sonny & Cher
_
32
Niki Hoeky P J Proby
_
33
Over The Wall We Go Oscar
37
33
Look At Granny Run Run Howard Tate
_
34
Popcorn, Double Feature Searchers
_
34
This Is My Song Petula Clark
_
35
Hurtin' Is Lovin' Billy Fury
36
35
Open Your Heart Jackie Trent
_
36
Skip To Ma Loo Vince Edwards
_
37
Strange Light From The East/That'll Be the Day Tuesday's Children
_
38
All Kinds Of People Fingers
_
39
Guess I'm Dumb Johnny Wells
_
40
Michael Geno Washington & the Ram Jam Band

Notes:
After four weeks with only 40 records in the Fab 40 (quite rare in those days), there are three joint positions in this week's chart: numbers 33, 34 and 35. In each case only the second record is in Brian Long's list from Curzon Street, but the first record was also played on the station and announced at the relevant position. However, while Alan Field heard both discs at numbers 33 and 34, the Jackie Trent record at joint number 35 was not played on the Fab 40 show and Alan did not hear it later in the week. Hans Peters' list reflects Alan's, as does Monty's Diary.

Although Alan and Hans Peters (who both listened to the Fab 40 show) only list Strange Light From The East, in Brian Long's list from Curzon Street the B side is listed instead. Wolfgang Buchholz had noted this side played as a climber two weeks earlier.

37
33
Look At Granny Run Run Howard Tate Verve VS 549

Like many soul singers, Howard Tate (b 1938), the son of a Baptist minister, began displaying singing talents in church at an early age. When he was in his mid-teens, a gospel group called the Belairs, consisting of Garnet Mimms, Sam Bell and Little Joe Cook performed a concert at the church. Impressed by the young Howard, they asked him to join them shortly afterwards, when Cook left. The group performed in churches around the Philadelphia area where they were spotted by a Mercury talent scout and assigned to Brook Benton's producer, Clyde Otis. Several doo-wop singles which they recorded under the name of the Gainors, unfortunately made little impact.

In the early Sixties, Bill Doggett spotted Howard Tate singing in a nightclub. Howard fronted the Doggett band on a nation-wide tour, although he never recorded with them. While he was gone, his former band had changed names to Garnett Mimms and the Enchanters and were enjoying a hit record Cry Baby, produced by Jerry Ragovoy. When Mimms played Ragovoy some recordings of Howard, the producer/writer wanted to record him, but nobody knew where he was. To track him down, legendary Philly DJ Georgie Woods (The Guy With the Goods) broadcast a message on WDAS for Howard to contact the station. This was the first time in his career that radio was instrumental in giving Howard Tate a break.

Soon after he began working with Jerry Ragovoy, Howard's records were not only hitting the heights of the R & B charts but also touching the lower part of the Hot Hundred. Look At Granny Run Run (Mort Shuman/Jerry Ragovoy) got to #67 at the end of 1966. Howard was to spend twenty years on the road, performing alongside the soul superstar alphabet from James Brown, Sam Cooke and Marvin Gaye to the Temptations and Jackie Wilson.

Dogged by the infamous music business problems of missing money and poor record company promotion, Howard stopped performing around 1980 and went to work for the Prudential Insurance Company. In 1994, he became a minister, working with drug addicts and the homeless. When Howard heard in 1995 that Mercury had released a compilation CD of his work (Get it While You Can - The Legendary Sessions Mercury 314 526 868-2), he thought someone was playing a hoax on him!

Howard had vanished from the music scene so successfully that nobody was sure if he was still alive. Searches had proved fruitless until in 2001, he was reached once again by radio. Phil Casden host of the Saturday night R & B show, midnight to 0300 on WNJC1360am ('Philadelphia's Renaissance Station') asked his audience if anyone knew where Howard Tate was. Listener Ron Kennedy, who had himself been a group singer, called to tell Phil that he knew Howard was in New Jersey and he promised to let him know that Phil was looking for him. When Ron encountered Howard in the local supermarket on New Year's Day, Howard's return to his musical career began. Via the Internet, Phil quickly spread the news of his discovery and at an age when few singers would consider making a comeback, Howard soon found himself working with Jerry Ragovoy on a new album and returning to the stage.

Howard's only other Fab Forty appearance occurred when Baby I Love You was picked as a climber in June '67. He recorded his final album, A Portrait of Howard, in 2006 and died in December 2011, aged 72, ten years after his rediscovery and stage comeback.

Webmaster's note: Some of the above information was gleaned from a long and interesting interview with Howard Tate conducted in 2001 by Jason Gross, which can be found at Perfect Sound Forever

Read the lyrics to Look At Granny Run Run here.

PS for lovers of Fab Forty trivia...

I'll Take Good Care Of You Cliff Bennett & the Rebel Rousers Parlophone R5565

The song chosen as Mike Lennox's final climber had already reached #30 in the US Hot Hundred in the spring of 1966 for Garnett Mimms, the man who introduced Howard Tate to Jerry Ragovoy. It may not have been played on Big L, but apparently it was aired on Caroline North. I'll Take Good Care Of You appears to have been originally intended as the Cliff Bennett single's B-side.

38
Sweet Georgie Fame Blossom Dearie Fontana TF 788

Described by Miles Davis as, "The only white woman who ever had soul", New York-born jazz singer and pianist, Blossom Dearie journeyed regularly to England in the mid-Sixties, appearing at London's famous Ronnie Scott's club and recording four albums for the Fontana label. Sweet Georgie Fame made an unusual addition to the usual Fab Forty fare, but the single proved very popular with listeners when it was heard again during the1997/8 Radio London Christmas/ New Year RSL.

Surprisingly, for a song with lyrics scarcely suited to a male performer, Sweet Georgie Fame was apparently also recorded by Tony Bennett. Not long out of the Fab himself, with Sittin' in the Park, Georgie Fame reciprocated with his own answer song, Blossom.

The enduringly-popular Blossom Dearie, who also recorded a tribute to John Lennon, called Hey John, still performed regularly in New York until 2006. She died in Greenwich Village in February 2009, aged 84. (New York Times obituary.) Friends and family launched an official tribute website.

Besides climbers that were played at the time of the broadcast of the Sunday Fab Forty, Alan kept a note of others he heard later in the week and incorporated them into his list.

DJ Climbers:    
Indescribably Blue Elvis Presley Tony Blackburn
Yo-Yo Billy Joe Royal Chuck Blair
Detroit City Tom Jones Pete Drummond
Reach The Top West Coast Delegation Kenny Everett
Four And Twenty Hours Ivy League Paul Kaye
I'll Take Good Care Of You Cliff Bennett & the Rebel Rousers Mike Lennox
The Ways Of A Man Chasers Mark Roman
Love, Hate, Revenge Episode Six Keith Skues
Ride Ride Ride Brenda Lee Ed Stewart
Finding You, Loving You Toni Eden Norman St John
Give It To Me Troggs Tony Windsor

Aboard the Galaxy this week:

Jan 31st
"I'll Take Good Care of You' was Mike Lennox's final climber. Deciding he had suffered enough of a 'life on the ocean wave', Mike left the ship, but he would continue to work for Radio London making personal appearances ashore. 'Give It to Me' was TW's last climber. He left Big L on February 7th.

Climbers:  
What's Wrong With The Way I Live Twilights
A Lovely Way To Say Goodnight Four Evers
This Just Doesn't Seem To Be My Day Roger Denison
You Got To Me Neil Diamond
There's A Kind Of Hush Herman's Hermits
Ol' Man River Billy Stewart
Call My Name James Royal
It's Too Late Kenny Lynch
I've Got A Lot Of Love Left In Me Maxine Brown
Baby Loot
You've Got Me High Science Poption (*)
Man On The Flying Trapeze Leapy Lee
I Fooled You This Time Gene Chandler
One Step At A Time Madeline Bell
Pretty Ballerina Left Banke (*)
Words Of Love Mama's & Papa's
She Del Shannon
Goodnight Irene Originals
Sitting In The Rain John Mayall's Bluesbreakers
Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye Casinos
Tightrope Inez & Charlie Foxx
I Don't Want It Cymbaline
Disc of the Week:  
Mellow Yellow Donovan
Album of the Week:  
Young And Warm And Wonderful Gene Pitney

What's Wrong With The Way I Live Twilights Columbia DB 8125

This is one of the instances where Brian Long's book, The London Sound, does not include the record on that week's playlist, but Alan Field heard it played on the station, which indicates that it was a last-minute addition.

This is also another instance of how success can fail to follow a band from one country to another. What's Wrong With The Way I Live which was a Big L climber for two weeks only, before sinking without trace, made the national Top Ten in Australia. The Twilights were formed in Adelaide, most of the members being British-born immigrants. The line-up was: Peter Brideoake, rhythm gtr, vocals, Terry Britten, ld gtr, vocals, John Bywaters, bass, Clem 'Paddy' McCartney, ld vcls, Laurie Pryor, dr, Glenn Shorrock, ld vcls. To read the full story of their considerable success in Oz, and their disappointing failure in the UK, I cannot do better than refer you to the Mileasago website.

A brief summary of the Twilights' story is that in July 1966 at Festival Hall, Melbourne, the group won the prestigious Hoadley's Battle of the Sounds competition, beating no less than 500 unsigned bands. Their prize was a return passage to England on the Sitmar cruise liner, two definite gigs and $1,000 prize money.

Penned by Hollies Graham Nash, Tony Hicks and Alan Clark and recorded at Abbey Road Studios by renowned EMI engineer Norman 'Hurricane' Smith, What's Wrong With The Way I Live should have had 'hit' engraved on it in gold. The Hollies had included the song on their 1966 album For Certain Because.

One Twilights' bio mentions 'encouraging airplay' of the single on Caroline, but how much exposure it truthfully got on the offshore stations is hard to gauge. Clearly, Big L failed to give much assistance, but the single did appear in Radio City's City Sixty, as did the band's earlier release, Needle in a Haystack.

As vocalist Glenn Shorrock observed upon the band's return to Australia, competition on the UK music scene was pretty fierce.

"Our biggest shock was the high standard of so many groups who are not even known. It was hard for us to get jobs with good money," he admitted.

Glenn will be known in the UK and probably the US, as a founder of the Little River Band in the Seventies.

Merely summarising the Twilights' achievements is in no way intended to be dismissive of their talents, so it's great to be able to calatogue some of Terry Britten's subsequent achivements, thanks to Alan Hardy:

Terry Britten is the member of the Twilights who should be best remembered. He's certainly been the most successful. He returned to the UK in 1970 to join Cliff Richard's band (along with two others from Australia including Alan Tarney). He has ended up being one of pop music's most successful writers, producers and musicians. He co-wrote Devil Woman and Carrie for Cliff (among others). He then wrote What's Love Got to Do With It and We Don't Need Another Hero (both with Graham Lyle from Gallagher and Lyle) for Tina Turner and more. So even though he didn't fare too well on the Fab Forty, it all worked out for him in the end!

A Lovely Way To Say Goodnight Four Evers CBS 202549

A second instance this week, where Brian Long didn't list a climber, but Alan Field heard it played. I was unable to find any info regarding the single's release in the UK, but Paul Coates was kind enough to tell me:

Just a note on the Big L Fab 40 dated January 29th 1967, or to be more precise one of the Big L climbers for that week. You speculate whether the Four Evers' A Lovely Way To Say Goodnight got a UK release. Well it did. It was released on CBS 202549. And being a US record, it had come out over there in November 66 on Columbia 43886. That's all for now trivia buffs.

The Four Eversname is hypenated in some places and not others. As it is shown on the record label minus the hypen, that is how we shall list it. The blog Whitedoowopcollector gives the group's history, although the exact line-up for this recording is not listed. A Lovely Way To Say Goodnight was written by group members and its harmony sound has been likened to that of the Four Seasons.


The blue additions to the climbers indicate singles listed in Brian Long's book 'The London Sound' based on information typed in the Curzon Street offices or other sources. The symbol (*) indicates additional information from personal listings, courtesy of Wolfgang Buchholz. Alan Field did not hear these records played or announced as climbers.

In this instance, Wolfgang confirms Brian's listing of Science Poption, and additionally lists the Left Banke record, which neither Alan nor Brian have noted.

Green additions to the climbers indicate singles sourced from 'Monty's Diary'. (See Fab Forty for 010167).
Alan Field did not hear the records listed in
blue or green played or announced as climbers.


The Caroline 'Countdown Sixty' chart (south ship) for this week is here
This week's Radio City 'City Sixty' on the Pirate Radio Hall of Fame is here
This week's Radio 270 Top 40 on the Pirate Radio Hall of Fame is here

Tune in next week for another Field's Fab Forty