The Early Radio London Fab Forties

Sunday 23rd May 1965
Compare this week's Big L Fab Forty with the KLIF Forty Star Survey from the same week (See bottom of page).
You'll find they have very little in common.

Françoise Hardy, leaping from #34 to #15

(I once met a guy who told me I reminded him of his favourite female singer, a lady he referred to as 'Frankus Ardy'. Sadly, the resemblance between me and the glamorous Ms Hardy did not go beyond my having long, dark hair - Mary)

Last
This
 
Week
Week
10
1
Long Live Love Sandie Shaw
9
2
Poor Man's Son Rockin' Berries
15
3
The Clapping Song Shirley Ellis
8
4
This Little Bird Marianne Faithfull
2
5
Where Are You Now (My Love) Jackie Trent
12
6
(You've) Never Been In Love Like This Before Unit 4 + 2
23
7
All Over The World Francoise Hardy
1
8
Wonderful World Herman's Hermits
31
9
I've Been Wrong Before Cilla Black
3
10
Oh No Not My Baby Manfred Mann
4
11
Subterranean Homesick Blues Bob Dylan
20
12
That's Why I'm Crying Ivy League
24
13
The Price Of Love Everly Brothers
27
14
Trains And Boats And Planes Billy J Kramer & the Dakotas
14
Trains And Boats And Planes Burt Bacharach, his Orchestra & Chorus
22
15
Marie Bachelors
36
16
Iko Iko Dixie Cups
5
17
Come On Over To My Place Drifters
33
18
I Want That Boy Chantelles
35
19
In The Deep Of The Night Dodie West
6
20
Not Until The Next Time Jim Reeves
21
Crying In The Chapel Elvis Presley
7
22
Bring It On Home To Me Animals
23
Incense Anglos
29
24
Mr Pitiful Otis Redding
11
25
Comin' On To Cry / That's The Way It Goes Mojos
13
26
Once Upon A Time Tom Jones
27
Anyway Anyhow Anywhere Who
28
28
Come Home Dave Clark Five
34
29
It Ain't Me Babe Johnny Cash
26
30
Don't Think Twice, It's All Right Heinz & the Wild Boys
31
Set Me Free Kinks
38
32
Be My Guest Niteshades
33
Yeah, I'm Waiting Force Five
40
34
When The Morning Sun Dries The Dew Quiet Five
35
Georgie Porgie Jewel Akens
36
I'm Alive Hollies
18
37
King Of The Road Roger Miller
14
38
A World Of Our Own Seekers
39
My Child Connie Francis
40
The Tables Are Turning Senators

'Incense' is also to be found amongst the 25 gems on
The Soul of Sue, Vol 2

23
Incense Anglos Fontana TF 561/BRIT WI 004/Fontana TF 589

There has long been controversy over this brilliant and highly-collectable single and the identity of the Anglos' vocalist, who is often alleged to be Steve Winwood. Some of the confusion undoubtedly arose because Winwood is known to have performed under the pseudonyms 'Steve Anglo' and 'Steve D'Angelo'. He has stated via his official website that he had no involvement with the Incense session. Despite this insistence on Steve Winwood's part, the single appears on the compilation CD The Spencer Davis Group Singles!

Brian Long reports in The London Sound that Tony Windsor was receiving letters of complaint from listeners. Having heard Incense, (first issued on an early Chris Blackwell label Brit – BRIT WI 004), they had experienced difficulty in finding it (to paraphrase a TW catchphrase) 'available at their local store'. The recording was then switched to Fontana, although the Record Collector Price Guide lists it as having two matrix numbers, Fontana TF 561 (unreleased) and Fontana TF 589.

Whether or not being with Fontana resulted in improved distribution, is debatable. The Spencer Davis Group's single Strong Love was released on the same label around this time and a month later, prompted TW to air further listener complaints about both singles' unavailability!

As to the mystery vocalist, Peter Young received a phonecall from the single's producer, Jimmy Miller, after he played the single during a Soul Cellar show. Jimmy (who died in 1994) told PY that he had sung the lead on Incense. If that is the case, Jimmy possessed an incredible, soulful voice and should have been making a lot more singles of his own!

It seems likely that Incense was recorded by Jimmy Miller and others in the States, as Chris Blackwell maintains that he heard the single while there (it was released on the Orbit label) and was so impressed that he brought Miller to work in the UK on the strength of it. Miller did work with the Spencer Davis Group and went on to produce many top bands, including the Stones. Incense was later recorded by Owen Gray (see Fab 7th March 65) as an Island B-side in 1967, and the Anglos' version of the song was reissued on Island in 1969.

Jimmy Miller (b 1942 New York, d 1994) was married to Gayle Shepherd, lead singer on the 1957 Top Twenty US single by the Shepherd Sisters, Alone. They had a daughter, Deena, who is also a singer and has her own website, where she shares family photos and biographies of her mother and father. Jimmy was the producer of many well-known albums, including the Stones' Beggars' Banquet and Let it Bleed.

Incidentally, the group's name is pronounced 'Ang-lows' and not 'Ang-gloss', as I heard a DJ (who shall remain nameless) refer to them during an RSL!


33
Yeah, I'm Waiting Force Five United Artists UP1089

Never ones to miss an opportunity for fun, Kenny and Cash, immediately spotted that Yeah, I'm Waiting (spelt 'Yeah' on demos and 'Yeh' on the singles when released, contained a couple of pauses – maybe to emphasise the 'waiting' aspect of the song. These were just perfect for inserting silly sound effects, and of course the Dynamic Duo did so at every opportunity. I remember thinking how clever and funny this was.

Force Five's lead guitarist Bert Pulham penned Yeah, I'm Waiting and also co-wrote the B-side, I Don't Want to See You Again. The other four members were Ron Gent (vcls), who co-wrote their next single I Want you Babe, Pete Gosling (gtr), Dave Osbourne,(bs) and David Skates (drms). They later evolved into the magnificently-named Crocheted Doughnut Ring.

A full-page advert on the May 14th front cover of NME (title once again spelt 'Yeah') failed to produce a hit.

 


Disc of the Week  
Looking Thru the Eyes of Love Gene Pitney

In the KLIF Dallas survey below, Gene Pitney holds the #23 slot with Last Chance to Turn Around, which in the States was issued as a single, coupled with Save Your Love. Looking Thru the Eyes of Love was the follow-up, paired with There's No Living Without Your Loving (a Fab Forty EP hit for Manfred Mann in November 65). However, in the UK Looking Thru the Eyes of Love was issued with Last Chance to Turn Around as its flip, forming a double-sided Radio London Club Disc of the Week.

Alan Field says, "The original UK Gene Pitney single (Stateside SS 420) really does use the 'cool' American spelling of the word 'through', as shown here."




KLIF survey used by kind permission of Steve Eberhart

Anyone unfamiliar with the connection between Britain's Radio London (1964-67) and KLIF in Dallas (which still exists today as a talk station), should read the Big L station profile. The following extract is from the KLIF 1190 tribute site, run by Steve Eberhart. Radio London fans are likely to spot a few similarities between the stations broadcasting respectively on 1190m in Dallas and 266m off the coast of Essex.

KLIF may not have invented the "Top 40 Survey", but certainly perfected it. Originally, a list of the songs the station played to be displayed at record stores, KLIF took it a step farther. KLIF's "Original Top 40 Survey" featured song lyrics, photos and profiles of the KLIF DJ's and newsmen, Studio shots, promotional tid-bits, and advertisements from clients heard on KLIF.

KLIF was a station that everyone listened to. To say this seems like the voice of an overzealous fan of the station, but the fact is almost everyone did in the 50's, 60's and early 70's. In the days of non-air conditioned cars, if you pulled up to a red light, chances are the same song would be playing from the radio in the car next to you. This was because everyone listened to KLIF. If you went to the pool or lake and walked among the sunbathers beside the water, each and every transistor radio would be blasting "Big KLIF"! If you asked someone at school if they heard something on the radio that morning, the answer was always "yes".

For most, the family's car radio was set to KLIF and the dial never moved. Kids loved it, teens dated by it, adults went to and from work by it.

KLIF was always a station to play above and beyond the Billboard Hot 100 national charts. Local artists were often featured on the KLIF Top 40 Surveys. There were many "local hits" made from airplay on KLIF. "Joe Stampley and the Uniques" had a number one song in the summer of 1966 with "All These Things". "Mouse and the Traps" likewise with "Public Execution". "13th Floor Elevators", "Floyd Dakil", "Kenny and the Kasuals", "Jon and Robin and the In Crowd", and even KLIF's own "Jimmy Rabbit" had a hit or two on the KLIF 40 Survey!

Other KLIF surveys (which underwent a series of name changes over the years) appear in the pages of the Fab Forties. (Click on the survey to see a legibile version.)



Aboard the Galaxy this week
On Tuesday, May 25th, Peter and Gordon visited the Galaxy accompanied by a journalist. See our full page feature.


Tune in next week for another Big L Fab 40!