The Early Radio London Fab Forties
Sunday 13th February 1966

19th Nervous Breakdown? No, just a bad hair day for Mick. Although the Stones had made a magnificant leap of 21 places up the Big L Fab 40, they were still being outdone in the songwriting stakes by Lennon and McCartney. Two versions of 'Girl' held #11, two recordings of 'Michelle' were at #26 and 'Woman' – which is credited to 'Harry Webb', a name Paul McCartney purloined from Cliff Richard – was new in at #37. Even Cilla's #20 had 'Yesterday' on its B-side!

Climbing 9 places this week, Dusty Springfield's 'Little by Little' is not the 1964 Jagger/Richards B-side of 'Not Fade Away'. Dusty's song was penned by Buddy Kaye and Bea Verdi, who also co-wrote her '65 success, 'In the Middle of Nowhere'.

Last
This
 
Week
Week
22
1
19th Nervous Breakdown Rolling Stones
4
2
These Boots Are Made For Walkin' Nancy Sinatra
2
3
A Groovy Kind Of Love Mindbenders
6
4
You Didn't Have To Be So Nice Lovin' Spoonful
9
5
I Can't Express It David Ballantyne
13
6
Tomorrow Sandie Shaw
17
7
Uptight (Everything's Alright) Stevie Wonder
29
8
My Love Petula Clark
14
9
Sha La La La Lee Small Faces
19
10
Little By Little Dusty Springfield
15
11
Girl St Louis Union / Truth
12
12
Have Pity On The Boy Paul & Barry Ryan
3
13
Don't Make Me Over Swinging Blue Jeans
16
14
This Golden Ring Fortunes
11
15
Call Me Lulu
37
16
Land Of 1000 Dances Cherokees
32
17
Barbara Ann Beach Boys
28
18
Cry Cry Cry Riot Squad
8
19
Second Hand Rose Barbra Streisand
19
Think Chris Farlowe
5
20
Love's Just A Broken Heart Cilla Black
26
21
Can't Help Thinking About Me David Bowie & the Lower Third
23
22
A Little Bit Of Soap Craig / Exciters
23
Inside Looking Out Animals
24
Jenny Take A Ride Mitch Ryder & the Detroit Wheels
25
Lightnin' Strikes Lou Christie
7
26
Michelle David & Jonathan / Overlanders
30
27
The Same Old Room Bobby Shafto
28
What Now My Love Sonny & Cher
29
Under Your Spell Again Johnny Rivers
30
Trouble Is My Middle Name Four Pennies
31
La La La Gerry & the Pacemakers
18
32
Mirror Mirror Pinkerton's Assorted Colours
1
33
Like A Baby Len Barry
34
Hold Tight Dave Dee Dozy Beaky Mick & Tich
34
35
You've Come Back P J Proby
36
You Don't Love Me Gary Walker
37
Woman Peter & Gordon
38
Never Let It Be Said Valerie Mitchell
39
Please Go Trekkas
40
Ever See A Diver Kiss His Wife While The Bubbles Bounce About Above The Water? Shirley Ellis

8
19
Second Hand Rose Barbra Streisand
19
Think Chris Farlowe

The two records listed at #19 this week represent either a joint placing or a conflict between sources; we can't be sure. Brian Long's list, corroborated here by Hans Peters, shows Chris Farlowe's Think returning to the Fab 40 on 13th February 1966 after one week's absence. Holger Postelmann, however has Barbra Streisand's Second Hand Rose listed at #19 instead. When we first posted the chart online in 2003, Brian opted to go with Holger's version in preference to his own, and until now the Barbra Streisand listing has stood alone. However, we feel that the evidence to support a simultaneous listing for Chris Farlowe is too great to ignore, and we have amended the chart accordingly. Alan Field

16
14
This Golden Ring Fortunes Decca F12321

On February 15th at Wycombe Town Hall, the Knees Club signed up the Fortunes: Rod Allen (member #86), Andy Brown (#87), Barry Pritchard, (#88) Glen Dale, (#89) and Dave Carr, (#90). This Golden Ring was not only on its way up The Fab Forty, but also the Nationals.

Right, The signatures from the Knees Club book

The Fortunes' support group, Peter Fenton & the Crowd, was also recruited to the KC. Backing Peter Fenton(#81), were Mike Jones (#82), Mick Maloney (#83), Nick Man (#84) and Ian Green (#85).

Peter Fenton was obliged to wait till October '66 to gain a solo chart entry with Marble Breaks, Iron Bends. The song, with its 'dum dum' chorus, was swiftly adopted as a theme tune by Big L DJ Pete 'Dum Dum' Drummond (#37).

My Knees Club notes indicate that the Crowd released a single called Last Taxi to Brooklyn which failed to chart. Where I obtained this information, I do not know and I can find no more about it!

A singer called Ian Green issued a single in '67 called Last Pink Rose (credited to Ian Green & the Silver Lining) and made recordings as Ian Green Revelation with Rosetta Hightower and Madeline Bell. However, so little information is available that it's impossible to tell if this was the same Ian Green as our Knees Club member.

Those who are familiar with my witterings on the Radio London site will know that I am a huge fan of the rich source of comedy that is automatic computer translations from foreign languages. Below is a French-to-English computer-generated translation of a review of the Revelation album.

One calls that of l' easy listening tinted jazz and of drunk person Brazilian. A whole program. Some will prefer speech of marsh mallow out of pie crust for evening, doubtful, anaesthetic n' import which Che Guevara out of grass. Jazz lines all, barded pompeux coppers, served on a pleasant voice, so appreciable qu' it destroys you the least second of your time of brain available! Ideal for the dinners lick bottom, with your beautiful-doche or your puffiness of owner. That runs all alone, not only one wrong note, never a too acute sound, nor too serious. Not, perfection of total annihilation. The kind of trick that our good old protective company of our dear goods interests likes to sell to us, in background music in the corridors of the overconsumption of our large surfaces, or on the quays, or in short anywhere. To listen after three beer cases, or to smash. To note the presence of the singer drunk person Rosetta Hightower, raising sauce a little, and of the medley torchant the bottom of the Traffic or Beatles. You will have been warned!

We have indeed!

Mary Payne



23
22
A Little Bit Of Soap Craig Fontana TF 665

Bert Berns's A Little Bit of Soap, was much recorded on both sides of the pond and had been a Top Twenty hit in the States for The Jarmels, in 1961. Unfortunately, Birmingham band Craig could not repeat that success, but their two 1966 Fontana singles are highly collectable. A copy of A Little Bit of Soap sold on ebay in 2010 for £98, while the Record Collector Price Guide values mint copies of the second release, I Must Be Mad, at a staggering £340 or more.

The main reason for the band's collectability, is its drummer, Carl Palmer, later of prog-rock superstars, Emerson, Lake & Palmer. According to Carl's official website, the band was called the King Bees (previously the Castaways) when he joined at the age of 15, in 1965. The other 'Craigs' were Geoff Brown, lead vocal, guitar, Len Cox bass and Richard Pannell guitar. Geoff Brown wrote Ready Steady Let's Go, the B-side of the first single, and both sides of the £340 follow-up. Adding to its mega-value, on B-side Suspense, is a guitar solo by one of the Troggs – in the studio that day to record Wild Thing.

Larry Page is credited with coming up with the Craig moniker, because he felt that too many other groups were calling themselves 'King Bees' (culled from the much-covered blues favourite, I'm A King Bee). Page wanted something outstanding for his latest Page One protégées, but they had built a loyal local following and were not over-enamoured with the name change. They disbanded mid-1967.

Carl shifted his sticks to Chris Farlowe and the Thunderbirds then The Crazy World of Arthur Brown and Atomic Rooster, before joining Keith Emerson and Greg Lake as ELP.

In 1968, Geoff Brown and Richard Pannell formed prog-rock outfit Galliard. They released two albums, Strange Pleasure and New Dawn, on the Deram Nova label. Both were produced by another Fab Forty artist, Phil Wainman. Geoff went on to successfully found computer games companies and Richard became a sound engineer with ELO.

Ian Cox posted a note on Youtube saying that his bass-player dad Len had entered the priesthood and still lived in Birmingham.

Returning to computer translations, my favourite source of information on the net concerning Craig, is a page from a Spanish website, which Google has kindly translated into 'English' for our edification. The title of the single I Must Be Mad translates poetically into, 'I must sees airborne magnetic detection'. (expensive b 'Suspense'). It's certainly right about the 'expensive' part and Airborne Magnetic Detection sounds like a very good name for a heavy metal outfit!

The Brumbeat website houses features on both Craig and Galliard.

Our friend Martin Kinch interviewed Richard Pannell for his Cherryblossom Clinic site from which we have borrowed the image on the right.

Disc of the Week:
Shapes of Things Yardbirds


The Caroline 'Countdown Sixty' chart (south ship) for this week is here


Tune in next week for another Big L Fab 40!

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